Tag: rrtc

Dr Corey Moore headshot

LANGSTON UNIVERSITY AWARDED $4.375 MILLION NATIONAL GRANT FOR REHABILITATION RESEARCH CENTER

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by Dr. Corey Moore, Founding Chair of the Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies

LANGSTON, Okla. – Langston University has been awarded a $4.375 million grant for its Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NDILRR).

The grant, which will total $4.375 million over 5 years, extends a third cycle of funding from the NDILRR Administration for Community Living which is intended to help minority-serving institutions build research capacity and study rehabilitation disparities. Dr. Corey Moore, the founding chair of the Department of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies at Langston, will serve as principal investigator and director for the grant.

“This national RRTC positions LU as the foremost national leader on the frontier of cutting-edge disability and rehabilitation research capacity building at minority-serving institutions and minority disability and rehabilitation research,” Dr. Moore said. “This center will provide Langston University a national avenue to mentor faculty members and students and provide technical assistance to research support systems to enhance scientific abilities and opportunities and access to federal research dollars at historically Black colleges and universities, Tribal colleges and universities, Hispanic-serving institutions and Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-serving institutions.”

The award involves a consortium of researchers and mentors at the Institute for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts Boston, the Kessler Foundation, and South Carolina State University. Other collaborators who will work with the LU-RRTC in carrying out activities include the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services, the Delaware Nation Vocational Rehabilitation Program and the Association of University Centers of Disabilities. The goal is to build minority-serving institutions’ disability and rehabilitation research capacity through research participation that examines the experiences and outcomes of people with disabilities from traditionally underserved populations, such as African Americans/Blacks, Native Americans or Alaska Natives, Latinx, and Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

One of the key studies will be carried out in partnership with the Institute for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts Boston and will involve a mentorship component with a new institutional Research Capacity Building and Infrastructure Model. This model aims to build the disability and rehabilitation research skills of both faculty members and students as well as the institution’s overall capacity for research. The RRTC will match select minority-serving institutional faculty and students with peer mentors and will link institutional research support systems with key consultants to build the center’s capacity.

The RRTC will also work with providers such as the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services and the Delaware Nation Vocational Rehabilitation Program to assess the feasibility of a cultural competence in Employment Support Training Model for providers serving people with disabilities from traditionally underserved racial and ethnic populations with co-occurring opioid and/or substance use disorder.

“Langston University is proud to advance the NIDILRR’s mission of generating knowledge used to improve the lives of individuals with disabilities,” said Langston University Interim President Ruth Ray Jackson. “The RRTC advances our institutional focus on access and opportunity for all people.”

The RRTC’s grant fund coordinated, integrated and advanced programs of research, training, and information dissemination in topical areas specified by the NIDILRR. These centers conduct research to improve rehabilitation methodology and service delivery systems as well as improve health and functioning while also promoting employment, independent living, family support, and economic and social self-sufficiency for individuals with disabilities.

Dr. Edward O. Manyibe, Research Associate Professor and Capacity Building Director of the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) received the 2018 Bobbie Atkins Research Award from the National Association of Multicultural Rehabilitation Concerns (NAMRC) on July 13, 2018.

DR. EDWARD O. MANYIBE WINS PRESTIGIOUS AWARD AT ANNUAL REHABILITATION CONFERENCE

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LANGSTON, Okla. – Dr. Edward O. Manyibe, Research Associate Professor and Capacity Building Director of the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) received the 2018 Bobbie Atkins Research Award from the National Association of Multicultural Rehabilitation Concerns (NAMRC) on July 13, 2018.

Dr. Manyibe was honored for his production of a significant volume of exemplary research and associated publications, research related to multiculturalism and disability, and development of research which has or will make a difference in thinking and/or practice in the multicultural arena.

It was the research and publication of Bobbie Atkins, the person after which the award was named, that provided the impetus for increased awareness surrounding the special issues impacting persons of color with disabilities. Her landmark research, “Vocational Rehabilitation of Blacks: The Statement,” published in the Journal of Rehabilitation in 1980, disclosed the inherent inequities for blacks served by the public vocational rehabilitation system.

Since her publication, Dr. Atkins has been a leading educator, publisher, researcher and trainer, grant developer, and spokesperson on multicultural, gender and other issues in rehabilitation.

The NAMRC is a diverse group whose purpose is to advocate for the rehabilitation needs of multicultural persons with disabilities. The NAMRC promotes and advocates a greater understanding of the needs of multicultural populations with disabilities, and assists multicultural populations to become self-sufficient and reach their highest level of attainment in society.

Langston University (LU) is a public Historically Black University enrolling a close-knit community of under 3,000 students. Langston University is recognized as a top institution of higher learning for affordability by afforableschools.net and bestvalueschools.com. Founded in 1897, LU is located in rural Logan County and has urban campuses in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. Langston offers more than 40 associate, bachelors, masters, and doctoral programs across six academic colleges. Visit us online at http://www.langston.edu.

NEW LANGSTON UNIVERSITY STUDY AIMS TO IMPROVE STATE AGENCIES SERVICE TO MINORITY IMMIGRANTS

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LANGSTON, Okla. – The Langston University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (LU-­RRTC) on Research and Capacity Building for Minority Entities released findings that will help state and federal agencies better predict and adapt to changing needs of minority immigrants.

Dr. Corey Moore, professor and chairman of the Langston University’s Department of Rehabilitation Counseling and Disability Studies (DRCDS) led a study comparing two forecast models to judge their accuracy in predicting minority immigration trends. The results provided a superior model that will be used in further studies.

The next step will be to use these findings to guide the future direction of larger studies,” Moore said. “One of which is currently examining vocational rehabilitation agencies’ perspectives capacity to serve minority legal permanent residents and new U.S. Citizens.

The study conducted by Moore and Dr. Ningning Wang, which was recently published in the Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, extracted nine years of case record data from the Rehabilitation Services Administration and then sampled through both forecast models to test performance.

Langston University’s DRCDS administers three different academic serving programs and the LU-­‐‑RRTC. The Department averages an annual student enrollment of about 120 students. The academic units include graduate programs in Rehabilitation Counseling and Visual Rehabilitation Services, (Orientation and Mobility [O&M] and Rehabilitation Teaching) and an undergraduate Rehabilitation Services Program. The Rehabilitation Counseling Program is accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) and helps prepare students to become certified rehabilitation counselors.